Exploring Deep Church

Andrew Walker & Luke Bretherton (Eds.): Remembering our Future: Explorations in Deep Church, Milton Keynes, Paternoster, 2007
Reviewed by Stuart Murray Williams

Youth Work after Christendom launched


The launch of the fourth book in the 'After Christendom' series took place in Birmingham on 8 July 2008.

The event, chaired by Dave Wiles of Frontier Youth Trust, was sold out and drew youth workers, training officers, church leaders and others from around the country.

Stuart Murray Williams introduced the concept and significance of the post-Christendom perspective that undergirds the series, before Nigel and Jo Pimlott, the authors, presented some of the key elements of the new book.

Planting Churches: A Framework for Practitioners


Published by Paternoster in October 2008, Stuart Murray’s new book offers church planters and those who deploy and support them an introduction to the issues involved in planting new churches.

Intended for those involved in emerging churches and fresh expressions of church, as well as more traditional church planters, Planting Churches draws on the author’s thirty years experience as a practitioner, trainer and consultant.

John Howard Yoder – Mennonite Patience, Evangelical Witness, Catholic Convictions

by Mark Thiessen Nation (Eerdmans, 2006) reviewed by Andrew Francis

In the Forward, Stanley Hauerwas writes ‘This book will clearly make Mark Nation the scholar of record about matters Yoder’. He is right. This is the best introduction to reading Yoder on the market – apart from reading Yoder himself.

Little things mean a lot

I bumped into Jeff (not his real name) on my way to the weekly communion service in the grounds of the mental health care centre where he is living these days.

'Hi, Jeff! How are you? Are you coming to the service today?'

'Well, no, I don’t think so. I've got a cough and sore throat, and I'm a bit bothered about all the stuff in the Bible about war …'

'I'm sorry you've got a sore throat. I do hope it will be better soon. Maybe I'll see you at the service another day …'

The Edge of Heaven

Directed by Fatih Akin, to be released in North America in May

Living in Germany in the early 90’s, I heard countless complaints about the growing Turkish population in that country. Invited to help rebuild Germany after the war, Turks have now been living in Germany for generations, in the midst of a people who have a very set way of doing things. This has resulted in a lot of tension and even violence. People have not treated each other as they should. With Turkey on the verge of joining the European Union, which is uniting a continent that feels completely different than it did twenty years ago, will people learn to live with each other in a new way in the 21st century?

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